To salt or not to salt? That is the question. Sea salt is often an ingredient that generates a great deal of confusion, as many of us are led to believe that because sea salt is more natural than regular table salt, it must be healthier.

However, Gina Crome, MPH, RD who is also an ACE-certified personal trainer, clarified that “sea salt and regular table salt are fairly identical nutritionally,” so essentially they have the same amount of sodium. “Because sea salt crystals are bigger than table salt crystals however, the same volume of sea salt doesn’t take up as much room as the table salt would, and thus, has a little less sodium,” said Miller. But as Crome has seen firsthand, the false belief that sea salt is “healthier” than table salt often leads people to use it more liberally, and thereby consume more total sodium.

Healthy Swap: RD Recommends

The bottom line is, use salt — whether sea salt or table salt — sparingly. As a general recommendation, Crome referred to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which states that people should strive to limit sodium intake to no more than 2300mg/day; or no more than 1500mg/day for those who are either over 51 years of age and those (regardless of age) who are of African-American descent or have hypertension, chronic kidney disease or diabetes. Want to add flavor to your food without the salt? Miller recommended seasoning foods with healthy, flavorful items like citrus juices, herbs, spices and flavored vinegars.

http://www.acefitness.org/blog/2436/what-are-5-foods-that-people-think-are-healthy-but/?utm_source=Health%2BeTips&utm_medium=email&utm_term=March%2B2012&utm_campaign=Consumer%2BOutreach&CMP=EMC-HET_0312